So, Not Only in Eastern Europe

One of the many things verified in the archives my team and I visited in August was that in the millions of files each archive maintains, there are misfiled records. Inside the clearly marked folders with inventory, item and record we found many records not in the inventory place, and the record for which we were searching was misfiled, with no way to find it. In fact, those records will only be found (and perhaps be able to be correctly filed) when someone else stumbles upon them, expecting to find something else, or as the records are digitized.

Today, I read the following, thanks to a post by Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee:

The Missouri Secretary of State, in collaboration with the Missouri Historical Society, announced the discovery of 13 pages from the 1880 US Census Population Schedule long thought lost.  The staff of the Missouri State Archives identified the pages thought lost since the 1880 census was released to the public in 1952. It includes information on over 633 individuals living in Union Township of Perry County.

In 2015 the Missouri State Archives along with the Missouri Historical Society began a project to digitize and make publicly accessible all of Missouri’s non-population schedules. The staff found the population schedule mixed in with the state’s 1880 agricultural schedule. It is thought that the US Census Bureau misfiled these population pages before binding them in the 1880s long before they were transferred to the Missouri Historical Society.

To view the newly identified records see: https://www.sos.mo.gov/records/archives/census/pages/federal  The p[ages will eventually be available on the Missouri Historical Society website.  For more information contact the Missouri State Archives at: archives@sos.mo.gov or (573) 751-3280.

To read the press release see: https://www.sos.mo.gov/default.aspx?PageId=9501  

Thank you Jan!

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